Calamus andamanicus Kurz, J. Asiat. Soc. Bengal, Pt. 2, Nat. Hist. 43(2): 211 (1874)

Primary tabs

no image available

Distribution

Map uses TDWG level 3 distributions (http://www.nhm.ac.uk/hosted_sites/tdwg/geogrphy.html)
Andaman Is. present (World Checklist of Arecaceae)B
Nicobar Is. present (World Checklist of Arecaceae)B
In evergreen forests upto 260 m; Andaman and Nicobar Islands. (Maps 2-4). (C. Renuka, A Manual of the Rattans of Andaman and Nicobar Islands. 1995)A

Discussion

  • Much local variation is ohscrucd In the length of Infructuscence. Some of the specimens especially from Nicobar and North Andaman Islands have longjlogellate Infructuscence, while others have short non-flagellate Infructuscence. (P1.6.A). (C. Renuka, A Manual of the Rattans of Andaman and Nicobar Islands. 1995)A

Biology And Ecology

  • Flowering November - December. Fruiting April-May. (C. Renuka, A Manual of the Rattans of Andaman and Nicobar Islands. 1995)A

Common Name

  • Motto, beth (C. Renuka, A Manual of the Rattans of Andaman and Nicobar Islands. 1995)A

Uses

  • Extensively used in furniture industry. Leaves are used for thatching. (C. Renuka, A Manual of the Rattans of Andaman and Nicobar Islands. 1995)A

Description

  • Solitary, large diameter rattan. Stem 24 m long or more, with sheaths to 8 cm in diameter, without sheaths to 4.5 cm, straw - yellow when exposed. Leaf 4 m long, cirrate; sheath slightly pale yellow, turning reddish brown, thick woody, with minute bristle like spines: spines upto 0.3 cm long, arranged in comb- like narrow crests, deciduous, mouth of the sheath with spines to 1.2 cm long; knee present; ocrea indistinct; petiole very robust, upto 5 cm broad at the base, with small spines on the margins; spines upto 0.4 cm long, often interspersed with a few smaller ones; rachis spiny along the margins and along the adaxial side at the distal end; leaflets 32-51 x 2.5-4 cm, regular, midvein prominent, lateral veins bristly on the upper surface; bristles 0.7 cm long; midvein and two lateral veins bristly on the lower surface, bristles of the midvein longer; margins with small spines; cirrus with whorls of 4-7 black tipped claws. Inflorescence erect; male inflorescence 1.25 m long, panicled: primary sheath tubular, 8-10 cm long, slightly enlarged above, the upper ones longitudinally split, sparingly armed with prickles; partial inflorescence to 80 cm long, twice branched; secondary sheaths unarmed, rachillae 2-2.5 cm long, often arched, with 15-20 bifarious flowers on each side; female inflorescence flaglliferous or not, primary sheath not tightly sheathing, armed with spines to 0.6 cm long; partial inflorescence 30 cm long: secondary sheath upper part splits open: rachillae 4-6 cm long, involucre cup-shaped. Fruit elliptic ovoid, ca. 1.4 x 0.9 cm; scales in 17 vertical rows, brown with dark brown border, slightly channelled, having an appendage of 0.3 cm long at the apex; endosperm not ruminate. (C. Renuka, A Manual of the Rattans of Andaman and Nicobar Islands. 1995)A

Materials Examined

  • Kalatang, South Andamans, 5.4.88, fr., Renuka 4Q56 (KFRI); Tharmugali, Wondoor, 8.4.88, fr., Renuka 4064 (KFRI); Wumberley-gung. South Andamans, 2.4.92, fr., Vijayakumaran 6624 (KFRI) Smith island, North Andamans, 28.04.1992, fr., Vijayakumaran 6639 (KFRI); Man-narghat. South Andamans, 1.4.1993, fr., Renuka and Vijayakumaran 7032 (KFRI); Baratang Island, 1.5.1964, Thothatri 10846 (CAL); Sipighat, 25.11.1978, Basu 7067 (CAL & ANC); Kamorta, Nicobar Islands, 1875 Kurz s.n. (CAL). (C. Renuka, A Manual of the Rattans of Andaman and Nicobar Islands. 1995)A

Bibliography

    A. C. Renuka, A Manual of the Rattans of Andaman and Nicobar Islands. 1995
    B. World Checklist of Arecaceae