Calamus speciosissimus Furtado, Gard. Bull. Singapore 15: 198 (1956)

Primary tabs

http://media.e-taxonomy.eu/palmae/photos/palm_tc_29948_1.jpg

Distribution

Map uses TDWG level 3 distributions (http://www.nhm.ac.uk/hosted_sites/tdwg/geogrphy.html)
Malayapresent (World Checklist of Arecaceae)B
Sumaterapresent (World Checklist of Arecaceae)B
Thailandpresent (World Checklist of Arecaceae)B
Trengganu, Selangor, Pahang, Johore, Negri Sembilan, Malacca: Endemic. (J. Dransfield, A Manual of the rattans of the Malay Peninsula. Malayan Forest Recirds 29.. 1979)A

Discussion

  • "Rotan sega badak" is a widespread rattan of lowland forest especially of alluvial forest and fresh water swamp forest. It is occasionally found on dry land near to swamps but has not been found on steep slopes on ridgetops. It has not been found above 200 m altitude.Calamus speciosissimus is a distinctive but rather variable rattan. In particular, the leaf sheath armature can vary from absent to very densely covered with bulbous spines. The pinkish tinged young leaves and the dull dark green colour of all parts turning blackish on drying are very distinctive. In the field it might be confused with C. scipionum but this latter is a much more robust plant with narrower, more numerous leaflets, with abundant grey scales on the leaf sheaths; furthermore young leaves of C. scipionum are never pink-tinged. (J. Dransfield, A Manual of the rattans of the Malay Peninsula. Malayan Forest Recirds 29.. 1979)A

Common Name

  • rotan sega badak (J. Dransfield, A Manual of the rattans of the Malay Peninsula. Malayan Forest Recirds 29.. 1979)A

Etymology

  • Speciosissimus - very beautiful (J. Dransfield, A Manual of the rattans of the Malay Peninsula. Malayan Forest Recirds 29.. 1979)A

Uses

  • Produces a good cane of appearance very similar to that of "rotan sega" - possibly it is mixed with sega in commerce. (J. Dransfield, A Manual of the rattans of the Malay Peninsula. Malayan Forest Recirds 29.. 1979)A

Description

  • Clustering moderate sized rattan with stems climbing to 25 m tall. Stem without sheaths to 1.2 cm in diameter, with sheaths to 2.2 cm in diameter, with internodes to 30 cm long, usually shorter on mature stems. All parts drying dull dirty blackish. Sheaths rick dark green variable in armature, varying from unarmed to sparsely armed with dark green spines to 2 cm long to densely armed with bulbous-based reflexed spines to 1 cm long, the bulbous bases frequently confluent. Flagellum to 2 m long. Ocrea inconspicuous. Knee well-developed. Young leaf flushed pinkish. Leaf ecirrate, usually with petiole not exceeding 5 cm, to 1 m in all with up to about 10 broad cucculate dull dark green leaflets on either side, the terminal two slightly joined below, ± unarmed, the longest to about 35 cm long by 7 cm wide. Juvenile leaves with straw-coloured petiole spines. Inflorescences male and female superficially similar, to 2 m long bearing up to 12 partial inflorescences to 60 cm long. Partial inflorescences bearing up to 12 rachillae on each side, male rachillae to 4 cm long, female to 10 cm. Ripe fruit rounded, to about 1 cm in diameter very shortly beaked with the stigmatic remains (c. 1 mm high), covered in 15-18 vertical rows of pale dull green scales (drying mid-brown). Seed about 7 mm in diameter, slightly pitted. Endosperm ± homogeneous. Seedling leaf bifid. (J. Dransfield, A Manual of the rattans of the Malay Peninsula. Malayan Forest Recirds 29.. 1979)A

Bibliography

    A. J. Dransfield, A Manual of the rattans of the Malay Peninsula. Malayan Forest Recirds 29.. 1979
    B. World Checklist of Arecaceae